Showing posts with label Georgia employment. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Georgia employment. Show all posts

Friday, April 15, 2022

Georgia unemployment rate levels off in March, breaking previous trend

Georgia’s unemployment rate stood at 3.1% in March 2022. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the change in the state’s unemployment rate over the month was within the sample error range, so speaking statistically, the rate remained stable from February to March. A  year ago, the state’s unemployment rate stood at 4.4%.

Nonfarm employment was little changed in March, but recorded a 5.2% rise compared to March 2021. In March 2022, the state’s nonfarm employment stood at 4,740,400, up 234,400 over the past 12 months.

Unemployment in Georgia

Because the household sample for the state is only a small subset of the national sample, it takes a much greater change in the state’s unemployment rate to be statistically significant as smaller samples are more subject to greater sampling and non-sampling errors.

This can cause confusion where a number that may look smaller than the previous month may actually reveal no change due to the error range of the smaller sample.

Throughout 2021 and into 2022, Georgia’s unemployment rate was consistently below the nation. This trend was broken in March when BLS noted that the state’s unemployment rate was not statistically significantly different than for the nation as the national rate fell faster than for the state.

It is possible that this change in the trend may indicate that the state is reaching the bottom of its current trend and that Georgia’s unemployment rate may begin to rise in future months, either due to people currently not in the labor force deciding to return to search for work, or because more people find themselves unemployed.

If a rise in the unemployment rate is due to people being drawn back into the labor force, that can be a positive development for Georgia’s economy, while more people moving from employed to unemployed would be seen as a negative development.

Future months will better reveal whether Georgia can regain its relative outperformance.

Nonfarm employment

Over the first quarter of 2022, Georgia saw the addition of 65,700 nonfarm job, of which 64,300 were in the private sector and 1,400 resided in governments.

All of the private sector’s job growth was concentrated in service-providing industries, which added 64,700 jobs, while the goods-producing sector, which includes manufacturing and construction, saw a decline of 400 jobs in the first three months of the year.

Within the goods-producing sector, the construction industries showed a net loss of 4,000 jobs, while manufacturing in the state recorded an increase of 3,400 jobs. 

Saturday, March 26, 2022

Georgia shows strong job market continuing in February

Georgia added 24,700 new jobs in February following a revised increase of 25,000 jobs in January, according to new data released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

With these most recent two months, the state saw an over-the-year increase of 232,000 jobs or 5.2%, with 228,400 jobs created by the private sector.

February marked the fourth consecutive month where the total number of nonfarm jobs in the state recorded a new high, reaching the 4.7 million mark.

The state’s unemployment rate remained at 3.2%, the same as January, although the number of employed inched upwards, while the number of unemployed inched downward over the month.

Employment by industry sector

Most industry sectors in Georgia recorded increases over the month, with jobs in the professional and business services sector rising by 10,500 in February. Over the past 12 months, the sector has seen an increase of 52,500 jobs, or 7.3%.

Among private industry sectors, construction stood out as losing 4,300 jobs in February, after seasonal adjustment. With the February decrease, construction employment fell below its pre-Covid level.

The leisure and hospitality sector, hard hit by Covid-related shutdowns and cutbacks in 2020, saw an increase of 4,300 jobs in February. Over the past 12 months, the sector has recorded a net addition of 43,800 jobs, or 10.1%. Despite the gains, employment in this sector remains below its pre-Covid levels.

Another area still struggling to reach are state and local governments. State government lost 300 jobs in February. Over the past year, state government employment has shrunk by 3,100 jobs or -2%.

Employment in local governments fell by 100 jobs in February. Over the past 12 months, employment in this sector has risen by 7,100 or 1.8%.

Friday, January 28, 2022

Georgia December employment by the numbers

 State Employment and Unemployment - December 2021 - Seasonally Adjusted

Number employed 5,177,893

Number unemployed 5,041,987

Unemployment rate 2.6

Labor force participation rate 61.5

Employment-population rate 59.8

Net number of nonfarm jobs created over the month 24,200

Net number of nonfarm jobs created over the year 198,200

Percent change in nonfarm jobs over the year 4.5


For more detailed information and commentary, see 

Georgia’s lack of Covid restrictions hurting the state’s businesses and labor force


Friday, December 17, 2021

Georgia unemployment rate drops to a new low, employment up in November

Georgia Nonfarm Employment Levels 

Georgia’s unemployment rate dropped to 2.8 percent in November, the lowest rate recorded by the state since records began in 1976, and the first time the state’s unemployment rate has fallen below 3.0 percent. 

The rate declined came as the number of employed Georgians rose by 11,983, while the number of unemployed dropped by 12,218. The state’s labor force participation rate remained unchanged at 61.5 percent, while the state’s employment-population ratio stood at 59.7 percent. 

Georgia’s unemployment rate remained well below the national unemployment rate of 4.2 percent in November. 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Nebraska had the lowest jobless rate in November, 1.8 percent, followed by Utah, 2.1 percent. The rates in Georgia (2.8 percent), Nebraska (1.8 percent), Oklahoma (2.5 percent), Utah (2.1 percent), and West Virginia (4.0 percent) set new series lows. (All state series begin in 1976.) 

Job Growth 

In November, the number of nonfarm jobs in Georgia grew by 13,500 after growing by more than 20,000 in each of the two previous months. With the additional jobs added in November, the state remains only 48,000 jobs short of the number it recorded prior to the pandemic beginning in early 2020. 

All of the growth in November occurred in the private sector, which added 14,000 jobs over the month while government jobs declined by 500. The state’s private sector remains only 27,000 jobs short of its numbers prior to the beginning of the pandemic. 

For the first 11 months of 2021, the state has recorded a job growth rate of 3.8 percent, with the private sector showing a 4.4 percent growth rate. Job growth has not risen at this rate since the mid-1990s. 

Jobs by sector 

Transportation, warehousing, and utilities added the greatest number of jobs in November, up by 4,300 for a 1.6 percent increase over the month. 

Other notable job sectors in the month included manufacturing, which added 3,400 jobs, and the leisure and hospitality industry, which added 3,200 jobs in November. 

Retail trade dragged down the overall numbers with a loss of 5,100 jobs in November. 

Over the past 12 months, Georgia has seen the addition of 192,700 jobs for a growth rate of 4.4 percent. Of those, 190,800 jobs were in the private sector, while governments added 1,900 jobs. 

Sectors adding the most jobs in the past 12 months included professional and business services, up by 58,200 (8.3 percent) and leisure and hospitality, up by 33,000 (7.9 percent). 

State government was the only sector losing jobs since last November, down by 900 jobs, or -0.6 percent.


Friday, November 19, 2021

Georgia unemployment rate drops to 3.1%; jobs increase by 21,100 in October

Unemployment rate in Georgia declined while the number of jobs in the state rose in October, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Georgia’s unemployment rate stood at 3.1 percent in October, and the state saw a net increase of 21,100 jobs. Numbers are preliminary, subject to revision, and have been seasonally adjusted.

Georgia unemployment

The state’s unemployment rate reached a series low of 3.1 percent in September as the number of employed people rose by 11,008 and the number of unemployed dropped by 12,897.

Labor force declined by 1,889 persons in October after increasing in each of the four previous months. As a result, Georgia’s labor force participation rate was 61.5 percent in October. Labor force participation is calculated by combining the number of people counted as employed with the number counted as unemployed to determine the state’s labor force.

Employment-population ratio remained unchanged in October at 59.6 percent. The employment-population ratio is the percentage of the state’s estimated population who are employed.

In October 2020, the state’s unemployment rate stood at 5.9 percent with a labor force participation rate of 61.7 percent and an employment-population ratio of 58.1 percent.

Georgia jobs

The state saw a net increase of 21,100 jobs in October with the private sector increasing by 22,300, while government jobs dropped by 1,200.

Over the month, the largest increases were in the transportation, warehouse, and utilities sector with an increase of 3,600 jobs followed by the addition of 3,400 jobs in education and health care services. Manufacturing employment rose by 3,300 and professional and business services increased by 3,200. Retail trade employment rose up by 3,000.

State government jobs declined by 500 and jobs in local governments decreased by 400.

Since October 2020, Georgia has seen a net increase of 196,900 jobs resulting in a 4.5 percent growth rate.

Jobs in the private sector rose by 198,900 (5.3 percent) and government jobs declined by 2,000 (-0.3 percent).

Over the past year, jobs in the professional and business services sector have increased by 60,400, up by 8.7 percent. Employment in the leisure and hospitality sector has risen by 31,300, a 7.5 percent increase.

Transportation, warehouse, and utilities accounted for the largest percentage increase over the year, up by 9.9 percent, or 23,300 jobs. Employment in the education and health care services sector rose by 23,300 (4 percent).

State government employment has declined by 300 jobs (-0.2 percent), while local government jobs rose by 2,100 (0.5 percent).




Thursday, November 18, 2021

Update: Georgia October unemployment rate: 3.1%, Jobs increase by 21,100

The Georgia Department of Labor has issued its report for October 2021. The preliminary numbers indicate a state unemployment rate of 3.1 percent, while the numbers of jobs in the state rose by 21,100 over the month after seasonal adjustment.

All of the increase in jobs in October can be attributed to the private sector, where jobs grew by 22,300 over the month, while government jobs dropped by 1,200.

Over the past year, the number of net new jobs in the state has risen by 196,900, a 4.5 percent increase. Private sector employment accounted for all of the increase with private sector jobs growing by 198,900, a 5.3 percent increase since October 2020. Jobs in the government sector of the state’s economy declined by 2,000 over the past year.

The report also shows revisions to the information reported for September 2021. Preliminary data for September indicated a state unemployment rate of 3.2 percent with increase of 14,300 jobs over the month. With the revisions, September’s unemployment rate now stands at 3.3 percent and a jobs increase of 20,600 over the previous month.

More detailed information will be available on Friday, November 19, when the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics will issue their October report for states.


Saturday, November 6, 2021

Georgia sees job growth in September but without much help from the metro areas

 Georgia nonfarm employment, January-September 2021

Georgia added 14,300 nonfarm jobs in September after seeing a net decline of 700 jobs in August, according to new and revised seasonally adjusted data provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Although the 29-county area that makes up metropolitan Atlanta accounts for more than 60% of the state’s nonfarm jobs, it contributed only a third of the state’s job growth in September.

Georgia’s other 13 metro areas reported a net increase of less than a tenth of the state’s increase, with the majority of job growth occurring in the state’s rural area, according to BLS.

The state recorded an unemployment rate of 3.2% in September, down from 3.5% reported in August.

Before seasonal adjustment, both the state and the metro Atlanta’s unemployment rate in September came in at 2.5%.

Atlanta and statewide employment

Before seasonal adjustment, the Atlanta metro area saw an increase of 4,000 jobs in September, all of which belonged to the government sector (Federal, state, and local governments).

Private sector employment fell by 1,700 jobs in the Atlanta metro area. The rest of Georgia, excluding the Atlanta area, saw a net gain of 1,900 private sector jobs over the month.

Construction jobs grew by 500 in the Atlanta area and the state added another 500 jobs in the rest of the state.

Manufacturing jobs grew by 1,300 jobs in the Atlanta metro area even as the rest of the state recorded a decline of 1,600 jobs.

Health care and social assistance jobs fell by 3,300 in the metro Atlanta area but rose by 1,200 in the rest of Georgia.

Employment in food services and drinking places dropped by 3,000 in metro Atlanta, while the rest of Georgia saw a loss of 1,800 jobs.

As mentioned above, government jobs were a bright spot for the Atlanta metro area, rising by 5,700 over the month. The rest of Georgia saw a net increase of 700 jobs in September.


Sunday, October 24, 2021

Job openings and quits headed for a record year in Georgia

 

Employers are advertising job opportunities in Georgia even as the number of people quitting their jobs reaches a record while the actual number of filled positions continues to grow but at a slower pace.

Number of people quitting their job in Georgia

(January 2011 to August 2021, seasonally adjusted)

Georgia set new state records for the number of people who chose to quit their jobs and for the number of job openings posted by employers, according to newly released information from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

In August, 192,000 workers in Georgia quit their jobs, the largest single month number since the series began in 2000, putting Georgia on track for a record number of employees quitting their jobs in calendar 2021.

Georgia is on track to record the largest number of people choosing to leave their employment since the series began in 2000. For the first eight months of 2021, the number of job quitters has already reached 1,256,000 compared to 1,418,000 for all of 2018. 

The number of people quitting their jobs is a statistic watched by economists, as BLS explains, “Quits are generally voluntary separations initiated by the employee. Therefore, the quits rate can serve as a measure of workers’ willingness or ability to leave jobs.” 

A similar story is being told in the number of job openings, which also set a record in August. Georgia employers posted 394,000 job openings as of the last day of August, the highest one-month level since the series began in 2000. 

As with the number of people quitting their jobs, the number of job openings are set to reach a calendar year record. Prior to this year, 2019 saw the largest number of openings at 2,787,000 over 12 months. So far in 2021, employers have posted 2,706,000 for the first eight months of the year. 

In August, the state posted a 3.5% unemployment rate as 181,591 people received unemployment benefits, which means that Georgia recorded 2.17 job openings for every unemployed person receiving benefits. In September the state’s unemployment rate dropped to 3.2%. 

The information provided comes from seasonally adjusted data published by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics from the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS). The JOLTS program provides information on labor demand and turnover. Additional information about the JOLTS program can be found at www.bls.gov/jlt/. Estimates are published for job openings, hires, quits, layoffs and discharges, and 1.6 separations. The JOLTS program covers all private nonfarm establishments, as well as civilian federal, state, and local government entities in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. 

Georgia job growth moderates 

A separate report from BLS showed that the number of new nonfarm jobs created in Georgia rose by 14,300 in September after falling by 700 in August. Both private sector and government employment, which had been growing strongly in June and July slowed significantly in August and September.

Combining the months of June and July, private sector jobs rose by 68,700 and government employment (Federal, state, and local governments combined) increased by 7,600 jobs.

For the two months of August and September, private sector jobs rose by 15,800, and government employment actually declined by 2,200 jobs.

In the third quarter of 2021 – July, August, and September -- employers in Georgia (private and government combined) created 49,700 new jobs compared to 87,600 jobs in the third quarter of 2020.

The increase in the number of people quitting their jobs in August can be interpreted as worker optimism about their economic futures, while the slowing job growth numbers might represent caution on the part of employers towards filling vacancies, or employers’ failure to attract enough acceptable applicants to meet their workforce needs.



Sunday, July 18, 2021

Georgia job recovery continues to show progress

 

Georgia nonfarm employment, seasonally adjusted

Georgia’s labor market showed progress in June and the state’s economy continued to recover, although still falling short of its pre-pandemic levels.

The state’s unemployment rate reached 4.0 percent, a level still 0.4 percentage points higher than its 3.6 percent rate recorded in March 2020. Similarly, the number of unemployed in the state dropped by 5,005 to 208,033, after seasonal adjustment. This compared to 186,995 in March 2020.

Georgia added 32,800 nonfarm jobs in June, after seasonal adjustment, the largest one-month increase since August 2020.

The Atlanta metro area accounted for all of the net increase in jobs, adding 39,000 over the month. The Atlanta area has consistently accounted for 61 percent of the state’s labor market over the past two years.

With the June job figures, Georgia employment sits now at 4,521,000, 116,000 jobs fewer than in March 2020.

At 2,781,600, the Atlanta area job market is still short 82,700 jobs from the level it obtained in March 2020.

2nd Quarter 2021

In the three months (April to June), Georgia 38,100 jobs, after seasonal adjustment, compared to a gain of 33,100 jobs in the first quarter of the year. As a comparison, in the second quarter of 2019, the state added 13,700 jobs, while in the second quarter of 2020, the state lost 340,800 jobs as pandemic-related closures and business drop-offs impacted the state’s economy.

The Atlanta metro area added 44,100 jobs in the second quarter of 2021, compared to 9,300 in the second quarter of 2019, and a loss of 239,200 jobs in the second quarter of 2020.

All information has been seasonally adjusted, provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and is subject to revision.

End of pandemic-related unemployment benefits

The State of Georgia chose to end Federal pandemic unemployment benefits on June 26, 2021. This meant a loss of $300 to individuals receiving weekly unemployment benefits.

The Georgia Department of Labor has reinstated eligibility requirements for both claimants and employers that were waived during the pandemic.

As part of the change, employers will again be charged for unemployment benefits for those temporarily laid off or working few hours during the pandemic. It is anticipated that employers may become more aggressive in contesting former employees who apply for unemployment benefits.

The July unemployment figures will be watched closely to see what effect the decrease in weekly benefits will have on individuals seeking work.


Sunday, February 21, 2021

Yes, the hospitality industry in Georgia lost a lot of jobs, but it may be the abrupt swing that matters more

 Calendar year percentage change in leisure and hospitality employment in Georgia, 2010-2020

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

By now, everyone knows the devastating impact that Covid-19-related shutdowns has had on Georgia’s hospitality industry. In 2020, the state’s leisure and hospitality sector employment declined by more than 10 percent; a loss of five years employment gains in only 12 months.

While the losses are severe, it is also important to consider how abruptly the change occurred and the emotional effect it has had on workers in that sector.

For the five years prior to 2020, leisure and hospitality employment in Georgia had grown on average nearly three percent per year compared to a 2.2 percent average for all private sector employment. More than 16 percent of the state’s net new jobs had been created by the leisure and hospitality sector between 2014 and 2019.

Employment swings within leisure and hospitality sector

To provide more perspective, the leisure and hospitality sector had added 13,900 jobs in 2019 before shedding 50,700 in 2020 according to information from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, a swing of 64,600 over two years.

The industry employing the most workers in the sector, the food services and drinking places industry, saw the largest swing, moving from a gain of 10,300 jobs in 2019 to a loss of 28,700 jobs in 2020, a swing of 39,000 in two years. In 2020, the industry gave up all of the job gains achieved since 2016.

The accommodation industry (mainly hotels and motels), while employing less than 10 percent of the workers in the leisure and hospitality sector, actually has taken the largest fall. The industry had seen a growth of 3,200 jobs in 2019 before recording a decline of 12,400 jobs in 2020, causing a swing of 15,600 over two years. With the 2020 decline, the accommodation industry in Georgia now employs fewer workers than it did in 2003.

For workers in both the accommodation and food services industries, the future remains very uncertain. The sharp drop-off of employment in two industries that were adding significant numbers of workers before 2020, means that career hopes for former employees in these industries have taken a sharp negative turn.


Tuesday, December 8, 2020

Georgia leisure and hospitality; arts, entertainment and recreation; and personal services employment and wages affected by pandemic and response in the 2nd quarter of 2020

 By now there is no secret that temporary shutdowns and permanent closures related to the Coronavirus and efforts to combat it fell heavily on Georgia’s leisure and hospitality sector. Over the first six months of 2020, the sector saw a 20 percent drop in employment and a 36-percentage drop in employee total wages. This compares to an 8.5 percent decline in the state’s total workforce and a 12 percent drop in total wages.

The good news is that since the end of June, the leisure and hospitality sector in Georgia has rebounded partially, but it is still important to understand how different industries within the sector fared in the first half of 2020.

Not all businesses within retail trade, leisure and hospitality, or personal services had the same employment effects. Some businesses have actually boosted their employment and payrolls as business increased even as other businesses saw cutbacks and closures.

In terms of providing assistance to businesses during times of pandemic and afterwards, it is important to distinguish both between businesses that suffered and prospered but also to distinguish to what extent employees and payrolls were affected in different parts of each industrial sector.

Retailers - Employment

Retailers in Georgia that normally see employment losses in the first months after Christmas saw those employment and payroll losses continue into the second quarter of the year. Retail employment dropped 5 percent (-25,577 workers) between December and March, and then from April to June, retail trade employment lost another 3.3 percent (-16,098).

As a percentage of the labor force, the worse hit employment groups within the retail trade were clothing and clothing accessories stores, down 27.5 percent (-9,936 workers) in the second quarter of 2020; sports, hobby, music instrument, and book stores, down 16 percent (-2,269); and furniture and home furnishing stores that declined 14.8 percent (-2,691).

In contrast, some retailers saw significant growth in their workforces, including building material and garden supply stores, up 7.6 percent (3,187) and food and beverage stores, which includes grocery retailers, whose workforce rose by 7 percent (6,466).

General merchandise stores that carry a mix of groceries and other merchandise certainly picked part of the trade that might have otherwise gone to more specialized retailers, such as clothing stores, but as the numbers indicate, the general merchandise stores did not add sufficient employment to offset the employment losses by specialty retailers.

The same was true for the category of food and beverages stores, which includes grocery stores. Grocery stores added more than 6,400 people in the second quarter of the year, but this did not make up for the job losses among specialty retailers.

Retail industry groups by change in employment in Georgia from March to June 2020

·         Clothing and clothing accessories stores -27.47% (-9,936 employees)

·         Sports, hobby, music instrument, and book stores -16.04% (-2,269)

·         Furniture and home furnishings stores -14.78% (-2,691)

·         Miscellaneous store retailers -12.9% (-2,790)

·         Motor vehicle and parts dealers -7.89% (-5,391)

·         Electronics and appliance stores -3.88% (-643)

·         Gasoline stations 0.39% (120)

·         General merchandise stores 0.65% (677)

·         Food and beverage stores 7.01% (6,466)

·         Building material and garden supply stores 7.59% (3,187)


Retailers – Wages

As with employment, the total wages paid by retailers in Georgia declined significantly between March and June 2020. With some retail groups paying higher average wages than others, for some retail groups the impact of employment declines showed up differently than the employment impact.

Clothing and clothing accessories stores reported the largest decline in their total wage bill, dropping by more than 37.6 percent in the second quarter, followed by electronics and appliance stores, which posted declines of 22.8 percent.

In contrast, food and beverage stores saw their total wage bill increase by 10 percent, and gasoline stations posted payroll increases of 10.7 percent.

Arts, entertainment, and recreation - Employment

With restrictions on large gatherings of people, along with individuals’ own reluctance to participate in crowds due to concerns about Covid-19 contagion, entertainment and recreational venues have suffered severe employment losses.

Companies in the performing arts and spectator sports business saw the greatest decline in employment, down 37.4 percent (-4,196 employees) in the second quarter followed by accommodation businesses, which includes hotels, that marked a 32.5 percent (-15,554) drop.

Food services and drinking places, which includes both full-service and limited-service restaurants as well as bars, saw the largest decline in the number of employees with the percentage of their workforce dropping by 15.6 percent (-59,789).

Arts, entertainment, and recreation industry groups by change in employment in Georgia from March to June 2020

·         Performing arts and spectator sports -37.42% (-4,196)

·         Accommodation -32.48% (-15,554)

·         Museums, historical sites, zoos, and parks -17.26% (-608)

·         Food services and drinking places -15.6% (-59,789)

·         Amusements, gambling, and recreation -11.9% (-4,319)


Arts, entertainment, and recreation – Wages

Although food services and drinking places saw the largest decline in the number of employees, accommodation saw the largest decrease in its total wage bill, down 48.7%. Food services and drinking places recorded a 31% decline in payroll, while performing arts and spectator sports-related businesses saw their payroll drop by 26%.


Other Services – Employment and Wages

One area that is often overlooked are other services such as personal services and laundry services, membership organizations and associations, and private households.

Personal and laundry services in this category range from beauty salons and barber shops to nail salons, funeral homes, laundry services, and other services such as parking lots. These businesses saw employment drop in Georgia by 18.6% (-7,334) in the second quarter with payrolls declining by 27.6%.

Membership organizations and associations saw employment decreases of 12.5% (-3,306) and payroll drop by 13.7%. Private households, which are defined as including workers employed by individual families, saw a 3.5% decline in employment with payrolls dropping by 7.5%.


About the numbers

Information on employment and total wages by detailed industry is provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages and provides the most detailed information on American industries. Because of the level of detail and the use of administrative records, the data are highly accurate but are delayed in publication. Current information is available only through the end of June 2020. More information on the QCEW is available at Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (bls.gov).

Friday, December 4, 2020

90 percent of Georgia counties show net job losses in the first half of 2020

 

Over the first six months of 2020, 144 of Georgia’s 159 counties recorded a net loss in jobs. This compares to 56 counties showing job losses in the second half of 2019.

As a percentage of total employment, the largest job losses belonged to Twiggs County (-45%) followed by Warren (-29.5%) and Clayton counties (-22.7%).

Both Twiggs and Warren counties have relatively small labor markets, with Twiggs’ loss resulting in 1,481 fewer jobs and Warren losing 515 jobs. In contrast, Clayton County has a much larger employment base and its loss translated to 28,498 fewer jobs.

In terms of the number of jobs lost, Fulton County (Georgia’s largest county by employment) showed the largest loss with a decrease of 108,000 jobs (-11.8%) over the six-month period.

Oglethorpe County recorded the largest percentage gain in jobs with a 10% increase followed by Crawford County with a 9.7% rise. Both are relatively small in terms of their employment base with Oglethorpe adding 181 jobs while Crawford added 123 jobs over the six months.

In terms of net job gains, Jackson County had the largest increase with 417 (1.4%) new jobs.

Statewide, Georgia reported losses of 8.5% or -391,426 jobs between December 2019 and June 2020.

Clayton County

Among the 11 counties with the largest employments, Clayton County, GA, suffered the greatest percentage in job losses over the first six months of 2020. The county, part of the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell metropolitan statistical area, is also home to Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and many of its jobs are located in the services sector.

The county saw more than 17,500 jobs disappear in its trade, transportation, and utilities sector and additional 4,600 jobs were lost in its leisure and hospitality sector, which includes hotels and restaurants.

The only sector to show a job improvement was in manufacturing, which added 477 jobs.

Table of Georgia Counties with net change and net percentage change in employment, 

December 2019 to June 2020



Monday, November 30, 2020

Pandemic-related job losses concentrated in Georgia’s 11 largest counties

All of Georgia’s 11 largest counties, as measured by employment size, saw significant drops over the first six months of 2020. Combined, the 11 counties recorded a net job decline of 10.2%. (-278,502 jobs). 

From June 2019 to June 2020, employment in the 11 counties dropped by 8.8% as a 1.6% increase in employment during the second half of 2019 was more than offset by the sharp declines in the first half of 2020. At the end of June, the 11 counties recorded a combined jobs total of 2,438,044, about the same level as at the end of June 2015. 

The job losses over the first half of 2020 were greater in those 11 largest counties than in the other 148 counties in the state. Georgia’s 148 other counties saw jobs decline by 6% (-112,924) in the first six months of 2020. Over the past 12 months, the 148 counties together reported job declines of 4.3% (-78,656). 

Statewide, Georgia recorded a drop of 8.5% (-391,426) jobs in the first six months of 2020 after a 1.7% increase (77,209 jobs) in the last six months of 2019. As of June, the state recorded a total of 4,196,040 jobs. 

County-level employment for Georgia’s 11 largest counties 

Clayton County, in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA, MSA, recorded the largest drop over the first six months of 2020, down 22.7%; a loss of 28,498 jobs. The county is home to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and a portion of the county’s private sector employment is tied to the travel industry, which has felt much of the impact of travel restrictions related to the pandemic.

Forsyth County, a fast-growing suburban county located north of Atlanta and also in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA, MSA, recorded the small employment percentage decline at 5.3%, a loss of 4,163 jobs. 

Job losses were not confined to large counties in the Atlanta area. Chatham County, part of the Savannah, GA, metropolitan statistical area, recorded a 9.6% net loss (-15,673) in the first half of 2020. 

Richmond County, part of the Augusta-Richmond County, GA-SC, MSA, reported a 7.8% loss (-8.274). In the Columbus, GA-AL MSA, Muscogee County showed a loss of 6.7% (-6,535), and in the Macon-Bibb County, GA, MSA, Bibb County reported a loss of 7.2% (-6,007). 

Weekly wages 

The average weekly wage in the 11 counties declined by 1.2% over the first six months of 2020 to $1059.91. The overall decline was less than for the state as a whole, which saw the average weekly wage dropping by 1.3% to $1075. 

Over the 12 months ending in June, total payrolls in Georgia declined by 4% ($2.4 billion).

Employment information comes from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program that publishes a quarterly count of employment and wages reported by employers covering more than 95 percent of U.S. jobs, available at the county, MSA, state and national levels by industry. Employment and average weekly wage data in Georgia were impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and efforts to contain it. Percentage may not add up to 100 due to rounding.

Thursday, November 5, 2020

Georgia showing uneven recovery of jobs

 Georgia saw good job growth in the 3rd quarter of 2020 as its job market saw a partial recovery from massive job losses recorded in the first half of the year.

The state’s job market is now approximately the same size as it reported three years ago, in 2017, despite its population growth over the past three years.

Georgia Nonfarm Jobs, January 2016 to September 2020

Over the 3rd quarter of 2020 (July, August, and September), the state gained 84,500 nonfarm jobs, before seasonal adjustments. This compares to a loss of 300.000 jobs in the 1st half of 2020.

With the gains through September, Georgia’s nonfarm employment stood at 4,456,200 compared to 4,619,800 in September 2019 resulting in a net job loss of 163,600 or -3.5% over the past 12 months.

Recovering sectors

Virtually all sectors, both public and private, were damaged in the first half of 2020 in response to Covid-related slowdown. In the 3rd quarter, sectors showed recovery at different rates while some sectors have not recovered at all.

Notably, the number of jobs in retail trade in September have shown a strong rebound. In September, retailers reported employment of 505,100. In December 2019, retail trade jobs in Georgia numbered 509,500 reflecting normal Christmas-related hiring. As expected, retail jobs dropped by 14,500 in January after the holidays, but the latest growth brings the number of retail jobs in the state to a level 17,600 (+3.6%) above the level reached in September 2019.

Other industries showing recovery from losses earlier in the year include construction as well as warehousing and storage jobs. Both industries recorded job declines of more than 1% in the first half of 2020, but job gains in the 3rd quarter have offset those earlier losses.

Still suffering sectors

Not all sectors have been able to post rebounds in the 3rd quarter despite the state’s overall improved numbers.

Local government employment remained below where it stood at the end of 2019 and below the levels obtained in September 2019. From December to June, local government employment in Georgia dropped by 19,900 and then continued to decline by another 600 jobs from July through September. Over the past 12 months, local government jobs have fallen by 17,600.

Georgia Local Government Jobs, January 2019 - September 2020

Wholesale trade jobs showed a similar pattern, declining by 6,400 from December through June and then dropping another 1,900 jobs between July and September. Over the past year, the industry has shed 4,300 jobs.

Georgia Wholesale Trade Jobs, January 2019 - September 2020


Atlanta metro area

Metro Atlanta Nonfarm Jobs, January 2016 - September 2020


The Atlanta metropolitan area is the largest metro area in the state accounting for 62% of the state’s job market as of the end of 2019.

Over the first six months of 2020, the metro area saw net job losses of 216,100 or 72% of the job losses incurred statewide. Private sector jobs accounted for 199,200 of those losses over the first half of the year.

In the 3rd quarter of 2020, the Atlanta metro area saw job increases of 61,800, of which 57,900 were in the private sector. Over the past 12 months, the Atlanta area has experienced the loss of 106,300 jobs or -3.7%.

With the increases, jobs in the Atlanta metro area in September totaled 2,749,700, just above the 2,735,400 jobs recorded in September 2017.





Sunday, September 6, 2020

Georgia Labor Day 2020 by the Numbers

Georgia Private Sector Nonfarm Jobs, January 2019 - July 2020

Statewide employment 

Number of private sector nonfarm jobs in Georgia in July 2020: 3,734.000 

Number of private sector nonfarm jobs in Georgia in July 2019: 3,922,300 

Change from a year ago: - 188,300

 

Number of public sector jobs in Georgia in July 2020: 657,700 

Number of public sector jobs in Georgia in July 2019: 664,600 

Change from a year ago: - 6,900 


Statewide unemployment 

Initial claims 

Number of people filing for Georgia unemployment insurance benefits in the week ending August 22, 2020: 56,758 

Number of initial claims for the same week in 2019: 4,440 

Change from a year ago: + 52,318 


Insured unemployment 

Number of people receiving Georgia unemployment benefits in the week ending August 15, 2020: 553,713 

Number of people receiving benefits for the same week in 2019: 25,549 

Change from a year ago: + 528,164

 

Statewide costs for unemployment insurance benefits 

Amount of regular Georgia UI benefits paid in the past 24 weeks: + $3 billion 

Amount paid in the previous 7 years combined: $2.852 billion

 

Georgia metro areas private sector nonfarm jobs

(As of July 2020 / Change from July 2019)

Albany: 48,200 / - 2,400 

Athens-Clarke County: 67,100 / - 1,500 

Atlanta metro area (Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell): 2,381.800 / - 134,800 

Augusta-Richmond County, GA-SC: 182,800 / - 13,500 

Brunswick: 30,200 / -6,400 

Columbus, GA-AL: 93,000 / - 5,300 

Dalton: 55,600 / - 3,800 

Gainesville: 79,800 / - 3,000 

Hinesville: 13,400 / + 200 

Macon-Bibb County: 83,600 / -5,100 

Rome: 35,900 / - 300 

Savannah: 152,200 / - 10,300 

Valdosta: 42,900 / - 400 

Warner Robins: 44,600 / - 5,100

 

Inflation in the Atlanta metro area (Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell)

(Percentage change in retail prices for the 12 months ending in June 2020)

All Items: + 0.9% 

Food: + 4.3% 

Housing: + 2.3% 

Electricity: - 14.3%               

New vehicle: + 2.4% 

Used cars and trucks: - 1.9%

 Gasoline: - 25.4%

 

Sunday, June 21, 2020

Georgia recovers 15% of jobs lost in March and April; workforce at levels last seen in 2014

Georgia nonfarm employment, January 2014 - May 2020
After recording two months of job losses totaling 531,000, Georgia gained 79,600 jobs in May.

Both the size of March and April’s losses as well as the May gain are the largest on a record going back to 1990, which may explain why workers in the state may be feeling a bit uncertain as to the future.

The combination of losses and gains in the first five months of 2020 means that the state’s workforce is at the level it achieved in 2014, when the state's population included 500,000 fewer people. More than five years of employment increases have been wiped out in the first four months of 2020.

While most industries showed some level of recovery in the May numbers, three industries continued to suffer losses in May including government; transportation, warehousing, and utilities; and information.

For the first five months of 2020, the industries incurring the greatest net job losses include accommodations and food services (-149,400), professional and business services (-64,600), and education and health care services (-41,900).

Metro areas

Since the beginning of the year, the Atlanta metro area has suffered a net loss of 299,400 jobs. The loss would have been even greater if not for the 29,000 jobs added in May. The Atlanta metro area workforce is now back to levels recorded in 2015.

Although that net loss looks bad, it is better than the net losses suffered in some of the smaller metro areas in the state.

For instance, the Albany workforce in May 2020 now stands at 57,700, nearly the level it achieved in November 1992, a loss of more than 27 years’ worth of job gains.

The Augusta metro area, which includes a portion of South Carolina, has lost five years of job gains, while Savannah, the state’s third largest metro area, now has a workforce equal to its level six years ago.

Future Unclear

How long it will take the state and the state’s metro areas to recover to their 2019 levels of employment remains to be seen.

If May is of any measure, then the recovery may occur faster than after previous recessions but only if (1) consumers and businesses feel more confident about the economy, (2) the state, which is constitutionally mandated to have a balanced budget, avoids massive funding cutbacks that will impact employment, and (3) the state can avoid a second wave of the coronavirus-related shutdowns.

Saturday, April 18, 2020

Georgia’s labor market tells a tale of two surveys in the 1st quarter of 2020


Georgia Unemployment Rate, 2018-March 2020, seasonally adjusted
Georgia posted meager 1st quarter employment growth but not due to the coronavirus based on a survey of establishments in the state, while the household survey showed definite signs of the impact of the coronavirus on labor activity.

The State of Georgia gained 5,000 jobs in the 1st quarter of 2020, an 85% decline from its job gains in the 1st quarter of 2019 according to the survey of businesses and government agencies.

At the same time, the state’s unemployment rate remained at 3.1% in January and February before jumping to 4.2% in March a rate not seen in the state since 2018.

The Georgia governor’s “stay-at-home” order was not effective until April 3rd, so the small job gains must be attributed to a general slowing of the state’s economy rather than to the effects of the state’s order.

It is possible that some people were curtailing their economic activities even before the order became official resulting in a slowdown and layoffs, which may account for the increase in the number of unemployed reported in the household survey.

Establishment survey

All three months (January, February, and March) showed smaller results than for the same months a year ago.

The Atlanta metro area gained 2,200 jobs over the quarter that includes a 500 job gain in the month of March. The 1st quarter gain represents a 92% decline from the 1st quarter of 2019 when the area recorded increases of more than 27,000 jobs.

The other 12 metro areas in the state combined to a net loss of 900 jobs in the 1st quarter compared to a gain of 3,000 in the 1st quarter of 2019.

The trend in the numbers along with the fact that the Atlanta area posted a job increase in March despite illnesses associated with Covid-19 in the metro area indicates that the survey of businesses and government agencies did not reflect any effects from the coronavirus in the establishment survey.

Establishment survey by industry

Health care and social assistance posted a 6,000 job increase over the quarter, slightly below the 6,500 job gain in the 1st quarter of 2019.

The increase was partially offset by a 1,700-job loss in the leisure and hospitality sector and a 1,300-job loss in manufacturing. Professional and business services remains the largest sector in the state despite having a net loss of 200 jobs over the quarter.

Establishment survey by area

After Atlanta, the Augusta area posted the next highest job gain among the state’s metro areas, adding 900 jobs in the 1st quarter of 2020.

Areas posting significant job losses included Valdosta (-900), Dalton (-700), and Athens (-700).

Employment/unemployment

In contrast to the establishment survey that serves as the basis for the jobs data, the household survey told a very different story for the first quarter of the year.

In March, the number of unemployed in the state rose by 55,442 to a total of 216,589 people as compared to 187,625 in March 2019.

The number of employed persons dropped by 77,876 people according to the household survey, with a net loss 22,434 people listed as dropping out of the labor force.

As a result, the labor force participation rate declined to 62.1%.

Effects of the coronavirus on Georgia’s labor market

The state was relatively slow in implementing procedures to mitigate the effects of the coronavirus, which explains the small effect on 1st quarter job growth.

For example, the arts, entertainment, and recreation sector, which is expected to experience a steep decline in employment due to the closing of many nonessential activities during the stay-at-home period, showed an employment increase of 1,500 jobs in the 1st quarter including a 400 job rise in the month of March.

It is expected that when the April establishment employment numbers are reported most of the industries and areas in the state will show significant declines compared to the 1st quarter of the year, and the state’s unemployment rate will continue to climb.

Whether these employment declines continue through the 2nd quarter depends on both how long the state’s stay-at-home order remains in place, and how confident people feel about returning to their normal activities.

Monday, March 16, 2020

Atlanta saves Georgia from net loss of jobs in 2019


Georgia showed the slowest annual growth in nonfarm employment in 8 years and the Atlanta area made up for a decline in the rest of the state’s job market in 2019, according to revised jobs data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Each year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics revises its preliminary job figures from April through December of the previous year as a result of an annual benchmark processing to reflect 2019 employment counts primarily from the BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW), as well as updating of seasonal adjustment factors.

Georgia’s net job increase fell from a preliminary growth estimate of 69,400 to a revised estimate of 63,200 for calendar year 2019 resulting in a state growth rate of 1.4%, the same as the national average.

Employment in the Atlanta area was revised upwards from a preliminary estimate of 66,700 to a revised estimate of 69,100.

With the changes, the rest of the state actually declined by 5,900 jobs in 2019; the first time this has occurred since 2011.

Metropolitan areas in the state recording declining employment over the year included Athens (-1,300), Columbus (-1,100), Dalton (-2,000) and Macon (-300). Valdosta reported no net job growth for the calendar year.

Warner Robins was the standout area for Georgia with a net addition of 2,000 jobs in 2019.

Friday, January 24, 2020

Atlanta area accounts for all of Georgia’s net job growth in the 4th quarter of 2019

Georgia job growth, 2006-2019

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

As job growth in Georgia continues to slow, all of the state’s job growth was concentrated in the Atlanta metro area, while the rest of the state actually recorded a net job loss in the final quarter of 2019.

Preliminary data released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that Georgia added 17,700 new jobs in the 4th quarter of 2019 with the Atlanta metro area growing by 22,600 jobs while the rest of the state lost 4,900 jobs between October and December.

For the year, Georgia added 66,700 job. In contrast, the state added 92,500 jobs in 2018 and 69,400 jobs in 2017.

The state recorded a growth rate of 1.5%, its slowest calendar year rate of increase since 2011.
The state did set a series low unemployment rate of 3.2% in 2019 as the number of unemployed workers in the state dropped by 14,742 in the 4th quarter.

Over the year, the number of unemployed dropped by 29,176 while the state’s labor force grew by 17,653. The combination of slower growth in the state’s labor force with fewer people seeking work contributed to the decline in the unemployment rate.

Georgia labor force, 2014-2019

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Atlanta was key to job growth


Atlanta metro area job growth, 2006-2019

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics


The metro Atlanta region added 65,700 jobs in 2019, an increase of 2.3%, its best calendar year increase since 2016.

Excluding the Atlanta metro area, the rest of the state added only 1,000 jobs over the past 12 months.
The small net increase for all counties excluding the Atlanta metropolitan statistical area was the worst showing since 2011.

Other metro areas in Georgia


While many of the metro areas showed some employment gains in 2019, the number of jobs added were below those added in 2018.

Albany recorded a 500 job decline in the 4th quarter of 2019 and a loss of 100 jobs for calendar year 2019.

Athens posted a 1,100 job gain for the quarter and a 1,400 net job gain for the calendar year.

Augusta recorded a 100 job gain for the quarter and added 2,800 jobs for the year.

Brunswick showed zero net job growth over the quarter and a 700 job gain for the year.

Columbus lost 600 jobs over the quarter and was down by 1,400 jobs for the year.

Dalton added 200 jobs over the quarter with a net gain of 300 jobs over the year.

Gainesville showed an increased of 700 jobs for the quarter with a net addition of 3,500 jobs for the year.

Hinesville lost 100 jobs in the quarter but posted a 400 job gain for the year.

Macon added 100 jobs in the quarter with the result of a 700 job gain over the year.

Rome gained 300 jobs over the quarter and posted a 1,100 job gain for the year.

Savannah added 1,400 jobs in the quarter and ended the year with a net gain of 2,100 jobs.

Valdosta gained 300 jobs over the quarter and ended the year with a net gain of 700 jobs.

Warner Robins added 100 jobs in the quarter and gained 1,300 jobs over the year.

Statewide jobs numbers and unemployment are a combination of metropolitan and rural parts of Georgia and includes information for 159 counties. Net gains for the metropolitan areas in the state cannot be measured by simply totaling the changes for each area. Some metropolitan statistical areas stretch over two states, so some metro job numbers include jobs gained or lost outside of Georgia. For example, the Columbus area includes parts of Alabama.

When BLS compiles the state data for Georgia, the agency excludes counties located in other states in their statewide data but includes them when measuring metro area job numbers and unemployment rates. As it happens, the Atlanta metro area includes only counties in Georgia, so by subtracting the Atlanta metro numbers from the statewide figures, it is possible to compare the Atlanta metro region to the rest of the state.

Sunday, December 1, 2019

Georgia jobs data for 3rd quarter revised up; job growth concentrated around Atlanta metro area

Georgia 12-month percentage job growth rate, Jan 2017-Oct 2019
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

With release of revised job numbers for September, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has revised upward seasonally adjusted job growth in Georgia for the 3rd quarter of 2019.

Preliminary data indicated the state had added 22,000 jobs in the July-to-September period.

With the revised data, that number grew to 22,400, besting the numbers for the 3rd quarter of 2018, which showed job growth of 22,100.

The Atlanta area recorded a better than originally reported job increase over the quarter. Preliminary estimates indicated that Georgia’s largest metro area had added 14,700 jobs but the revised data showed the increase to be 16,400.

With the revision, Savannah lost fewer jobs than originally reported with preliminary data showing a quarterly loss of 1,800 jobs and revised loss of only 1,500 jobs. Over the past 12 months, Savannah’s job growth has been anemic with an increase of only 1,000 net new jobs out of a total job market of more than 180,000 jobs.

Altogether, the number of new jobs added in all metro areas in the state rose from 3,900 in the preliminary estimate to 16,700 in the revised estimate.

Job Growth Concentrated in the Atlanta Metro Area

Despite the upward revisions, new jobs have become increasingly concentrated in the Atlanta metro area.

With the concentration of new jobs in the Atlanta area, the state’s overall job growth rate can be misleading.

While Georgia has a statewide job growth rate of 1.6% over the past 12 months, if you subtract out the Atlanta metro area, the rest of the state is posting a job growth rate of less than 0.8%. The Atlanta metro area is currently posting a 2.1% job creation rate.

Even though Georgia’s metro area is home to 61% of the state’s employment, for the first 10 months of 2019 (January-October), the Atlanta metro area accounted for more than 9 out of 10 new jobs.

Of the 54,400 net new jobs created in Georgia over the recent 10-month period, 50,400 were in the Atlanta area.

As a comparison, in the first 10 months of 2018, of the 74,400 net new jobs created in Georgia, the Atlanta area saw 49,100 net new jobs, or 2/3’s of the state’s total.