Showing posts with label contract. Show all posts
Showing posts with label contract. Show all posts

Friday, April 1, 2016

Delta pilots explain their request for formal mediation

On March 31, the Air Line Pilots Association, Delta Master Executive Council (MEC), announced that the union and Delta Air Lines have filed for formal mediation with the National Mediation Board (NMB).
Although filing for formal mediation, the airline and union continue to meet. The Delta MEC Negotiating Committee and Delta Air Lines have “exchanged proposals on Sections 11 (Training), 12 (Hours of Service), 14 (Sick Leave), 16 (Crew Augmentation and International Operations), 22 (Filling of Vacancies), 23 (Scheduling), and 25 & 26 (Benefits)."

Even with the March 31’s joint filing for mediation with the National Mediation Board, multiple negotiating sessions are planned for each week throughout the month of April and beyond.

Delta ALPA and Delta Air Lines have agreed to a negotiating protocol specifying meeting dates through the end of April. 

MEC Chairman John Malone has called for a special meeting of the Master Executive Council on April 20-22 in Atlanta. This meeting, originally scheduled for May 2nd through May 4th, has been moved up by Capt. Malone as part of the MEC’s efforts to demonstrate their commitment to our aggressive negotiating schedule as set out in the negotiating protocol.

Below is the letter provided to pilots from the Delta MEC Chairman John Malone:

Dear Fellow Pilot,
Today is a milestone in the negotiating process. I am writing to update you on our filing for mediation and its impact on the negotiating process as well as several significant items including the standing up of the Family Awareness and Strike Preparedness Committees, and a positive development in the rising market for pilots. In joint cooperation with Delta Air Lines, your union filed for formal mediation with the National Mediation Board (NMB). This has been expected, as mediation is simply another step in the process under the Railway Labor Act (RLA) and a contractually-mandated step established in the Delta Pilot Working Agreement. Mediation does not mean an agreement is imminent, nor does it necessarily indicate a lengthy process; it only means that both parties did not reach a tentative agreement through direct negotiations by the March 31st deadline. As noted in my March 20 Chairman’s Letter, this month we executed a protocol with management that defines a bargaining timeline and agenda. Both Negotiating Committees are currently adhering to this protocol with sessions scheduled through April. If necessary in order to meet this schedule, both parties have committed to continuing the process even without the presence of the federal mediator, once appointed. Your MEC has dedicated the resources to ensure you are informed. MEC Alert 16-06 was recently published with an overview of the mediation process under the RLA. More information is forthcoming, including a special edition of the Widget—know that we are resolute in our commitment to keeping you informed as to the status of our negotiations. I ask that you follow the process with an educated view and provide your elected representatives with necessary input and direction. During the March quarterly meeting, your MEC approved a Strike Preparedness Committee Chairman and we expect to have the Family Awareness Committee up and running soon. These important committees complement each other and their synergy is a necessary component in the prescribed negotiating process. Please get involved and join their efforts— our effort—and spread the word among your fellow pilots, your spouses and families. As I wrote in my last letter, be prepared for any eventuality. The stage is now being set in our effort to advance this profession. Last week, American Airlines announced a profit sharing plan for its employees. Just fifteen months into their five year contract, AMR management added a five percent profit sharing plan, outside the normal negotiating process, and absent any quid pro quo from pilots. While still an inadequate valuation, it comes from a management once adamantly opposed to profit sharing—now acknowledging its importance as a shared reward. In closing, your MEC and Negotiating Committee submitted a full and comprehensive “marketbased” proposal last December. We are prepared to meet our goal of delivering an agreement, one that you will strongly ratify, by this summer. Our negotiators depend on the currency of your visible support at the bargaining table. Please continue to provide them that currency by displaying your ALPA-approved gear and attending pilot unity events as called on by your MEC. Stay engaged. Get your family engaged.


Fraternally, Captain John Malone Delta MEC Chairman

Monday, August 17, 2015

UGA & Ga Tech football off the hook - athletes cannot form union


The National Labor Relations Board today declined to consider whether football players at Northwestern University were covered under provisions of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).
As a result, players at Northwestern University will not be allowed to form a union.
Since Northwestern University is a private institution, and not a state-run university, there was a possibility that its players might have fallen under the rules of the NLRA and be permitted to form a union.
Although any ruling would not apply to state universities, such as the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech, it was thought that a ruling in favor of the Northwestern players would put pressure on other NCAA Division I schools to provide some sort of similar "association" for their athletes.
Today's decision specifically indicated that the NLRB would be open to reconsider the issue at a later date.
From the National Labor Relations Board release issued today (Aug. 17, 2015):
In a unanimous decision, the National Labor Board declined to assert jurisdiction in the case involving Northwestern University football players who receive grant-in-aid scholarships. The Board did not determine if the players were statutory employees under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).  Instead, the Board exercised its discretion not to assert jurisdiction and dismissed the representation petition filed by the union. 
In the decision, the Board held that asserting jurisdiction would not promote labor stability due to the nature and structure of NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS). By statute the Board does not have jurisdiction over state-run colleges and universities, which constitute 108 of the roughly 125 FBS teams. In addition, every school in the Big Ten, except Northwestern, is a state-run institution.  As the NCAA and conference maintain substantial control over individual teams, the Board held that asserting jurisdiction over a single team would not promote stability in labor relations across the league.
This decision is narrowly focused to apply only to the players in this case and does not preclude reconsideration of this issue in the future.
Additional information on this case can be found here

CWA bargaining with AT&T continues


Bargaining between AT&T Southeast and the Communications Workers of America (CWA) continues after their contract expired on Aug. 1.

Informational picketing is occurring at various sites around the Southeast including in Louisiana and Georgia.

This past Saturday, CWA scheduled an informational picket and rally at AT&T building in Midtown Atlanta.

CWA is reporting that AT&T "continues to insist on open-ended hiring of temporary workers and cuts in healthcare and retirement security. The company has not responded to workers' concerns about excessive amounts of forced overtime hours that make meeting family and personal needs extremely difficult, if not impossible."

Read more at: http://www.cwa-union.org/


Sunday, August 9, 2015

AT&T and CWA workers in Georgia continue negotiations after contract expires

August 9, 2015, statement by the Communications Workers of America District 3, as 28,000 AT&T Southeast workers continue without a contract while negotiations continue.
Atlanta -- Today we are continuing negotiations with AT&T.  The issues that AT&T workers are facing have a direct impact on our communities and our families. We are your friends and neighbors, and our communities are important to us.  Often times in contract negotiations, we hear only about money.
But these negotiations are about respect, a better quality of family life and keeping good jobs in our communities.
AT&T is a very profitable company and our members do deserve to be compensated fairly.
But something that’s very important to workers at AT&T is a chance to spend more time with their families. Right now, AT&T forces employees to work an unlimited amount of overtime hours. That’s excessive and keeps parents from spending time with their children and balancing their work and family lives.
AT&T workers serve our customers on a daily basis and are the backbone and the face of this company. We all want to be treated with dignity and respect in the work place. That’s what these negotiations are all about.
AT&T is an extremely profitable company, with second quarter revenues topping $33 billion.  AT&T also recently completed a $48.5 billion acquisition of DirecTV.  Workers are being very reasonable, but AT&T is following a greedy agenda. Workers are committed to getting a fair contract and are holding actions and building support in communities throughout the nine southeastern states. It’s time for AT&T to do the right thing, and that’s to treat employees fairly.