Showing posts with label georgia job openings. Show all posts
Showing posts with label georgia job openings. Show all posts

Friday, November 19, 2021

Georgia workers experience higher levels of layoffs and discharges in September; fewer workers leave their job voluntarily

 In September, the number of job openings posted by employers and the number of hires were little changed from August, while the number of people quitting their jobs declined.

Job openings and hires

Georgia reported 415,000 job openings as of the last day of September as compared to 416,000 job openings reported for the last day in August. The September job openings rate stood at 8.3 percent. The national openings rate stood at 6.6 percent.

Georgia employers hired 253,000 workers in September, compared to 255,000 hired in August. The September hire rate was 5.5 percent as compared to the national rate of 4.4 percent.

In September 2020, there were 246,000 job openings in Georgia on the last day of the month. Employers hired 215,000 workers during the month of September 2020.

Separations and quits

Total separations in Georgia reached 245,000 in September with a separations rate of 5.4 percent. Nationally, the total separations rate stood at 4.2 percent.

Within total separations, workers choosing to leave their jobs voluntarily (quits) totaled 168,000 compared to 195,000 in August. The quits rate for September fell to 3.7 percent, down from 4.3 percent in August, For the nation, the September quits rate was 3.0 percent.

Although the number of quits decreased in September, the state remains on track for a record number of job quitters this year. In the first nine months of 2021, 1,427,000 workers have quit their jobs outpacing any other year since the start of the series in 2000.

The number of separations due to layoffs and discharges rose in September to 59,000, up from 42,000 in August. The layoffs and discharge rate increased to 1.3 percent in September, up from 0.9 percent in August. Nationally, the layoffs and discharge rate remained unchanged over the month at 0.9 percent.

About the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey 

Definitions and Methodology (National/State). Shared definitions and procedures for National and State JOLTS Estimates can be found at: www.bls.gov/news.release/jolts.tn.htm. 

Job openings include all positions that are open on the last business day of the reference month. The job openings rate is computed by dividing the number of job openings by the sum of employment and job openings and multiplying that quotient by 100. 

Hires include all additions to the payroll during the entire reference month, including newly hired and rehired employees; full-time and part-time employees; permanent, short-term, and seasonal employees; employees who were recalled to a job at the location following a layoff (formal suspension from pay status) lasting more than 7 days; on-call or intermittent employees who returned to work after having been formally separated; workers who were hired and separated during the month, and transfers from other locations. The hires rate is computed by dividing the number of hires by employment and multiplying that quotient by 100. 

Total Separations include all separations from the payroll during the entire reference month and is reported by type of separation:  quits, layoffs and discharges, and other separations. Quits include employees who left voluntarily with the exception of retirements or transfers to other locations. Layoffs and discharges includes involuntary separations initiated by the employer including layoffs with no intent to rehire; layoffs (formal suspensions from pay status) lasting or expected to last more than 7 days; discharges resulting from mergers, downsizing, or closings; firings or other discharges for cause; terminations of permanent or short-term employees; and terminations of seasonal employees (whether or not they are expected to return the next season). The separations rate is computed by dividing the number of separations by employment and multiplying that quotient by 100. The quits and layoffs and discharges rates are computed similarly.

Sunday, October 24, 2021

Job openings and quits headed for a record year in Georgia

 

Employers are advertising job opportunities in Georgia even as the number of people quitting their jobs reaches a record while the actual number of filled positions continues to grow but at a slower pace.

Number of people quitting their job in Georgia

(January 2011 to August 2021, seasonally adjusted)

Georgia set new state records for the number of people who chose to quit their jobs and for the number of job openings posted by employers, according to newly released information from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

In August, 192,000 workers in Georgia quit their jobs, the largest single month number since the series began in 2000, putting Georgia on track for a record number of employees quitting their jobs in calendar 2021.

Georgia is on track to record the largest number of people choosing to leave their employment since the series began in 2000. For the first eight months of 2021, the number of job quitters has already reached 1,256,000 compared to 1,418,000 for all of 2018. 

The number of people quitting their jobs is a statistic watched by economists, as BLS explains, “Quits are generally voluntary separations initiated by the employee. Therefore, the quits rate can serve as a measure of workers’ willingness or ability to leave jobs.” 

A similar story is being told in the number of job openings, which also set a record in August. Georgia employers posted 394,000 job openings as of the last day of August, the highest one-month level since the series began in 2000. 

As with the number of people quitting their jobs, the number of job openings are set to reach a calendar year record. Prior to this year, 2019 saw the largest number of openings at 2,787,000 over 12 months. So far in 2021, employers have posted 2,706,000 for the first eight months of the year. 

In August, the state posted a 3.5% unemployment rate as 181,591 people received unemployment benefits, which means that Georgia recorded 2.17 job openings for every unemployed person receiving benefits. In September the state’s unemployment rate dropped to 3.2%. 

The information provided comes from seasonally adjusted data published by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics from the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS). The JOLTS program provides information on labor demand and turnover. Additional information about the JOLTS program can be found at www.bls.gov/jlt/. Estimates are published for job openings, hires, quits, layoffs and discharges, and 1.6 separations. The JOLTS program covers all private nonfarm establishments, as well as civilian federal, state, and local government entities in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. 

Georgia job growth moderates 

A separate report from BLS showed that the number of new nonfarm jobs created in Georgia rose by 14,300 in September after falling by 700 in August. Both private sector and government employment, which had been growing strongly in June and July slowed significantly in August and September.

Combining the months of June and July, private sector jobs rose by 68,700 and government employment (Federal, state, and local governments combined) increased by 7,600 jobs.

For the two months of August and September, private sector jobs rose by 15,800, and government employment actually declined by 2,200 jobs.

In the third quarter of 2021 – July, August, and September -- employers in Georgia (private and government combined) created 49,700 new jobs compared to 87,600 jobs in the third quarter of 2020.

The increase in the number of people quitting their jobs in August can be interpreted as worker optimism about their economic futures, while the slowing job growth numbers might represent caution on the part of employers towards filling vacancies, or employers’ failure to attract enough acceptable applicants to meet their workforce needs.



Saturday, December 19, 2020

Georgia Job Recovery: Where the Jobs Are and Are Not

 Georgia Nonfarm Employment, January 2019 - November 2020

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics


As the job market in Georgia continues to recover from the shock of the Coronavirus pandemic and related temporary and permanent shutdowns of businesses, some industries are coming back at a faster pace than others.

In November, the state recorded a total of 4,561,700 jobs, an increase of 438.000 jobs compared to April but still 110,000 fewer than it contained at the end of 2019.

But while many businesses are not employing as many workers as they did 11 months ago, others have increased their employment.

Which industries continue to grow jobs and which industries end up with smaller net employments is very dependent on the direction of the economy moving forward. While a vaccine may improve the revenue outlook for some industries, economists will be looking to see if shifts in consumer behavior may have lasting effects that permanently shift employment patterns in the state.

Information from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Quarterly Census of Employment showed that the largest job losses occurred in the Atlanta metro area although even those losses were not uniform among the metro Atlanta counties. Indicators as to whether job markets rebound to their previous levels even as economic activity increases will be important to watch over the coming year.

 

Industries adding jobs

Retail. One of the most interesting recoveries has been in retail. Retail jobs declined by 38,100 between the end of December and April, but since then they have rebounded by more than their earlier losses for a net gain in jobs of 20,900 over the 11 months of 2020.

Temporary employment services. Another industry that suffered large layoffs was the employment services industry as companies cut back on temporary help as business revenues declined. From the end of 2019 to April, the temporary help industry saw a drop of 46,300 jobs. With a sharp pickup in temporary jobs from May through August followed by continued, although mor modest, growth in September, October, and November, employment services have actually added 7,600 jobs since the first of the year.

Ambulatory health care services. As the pandemic increased, the public avoided going to health care providers for non-emergency health services, so outpatient centers and any non-critical health care that did not require an overnight hospital stay saw significant drops in business resulting in layoffs. From the end of 2019 through April, the industry saw a net loss of 25,800 jobs in the state. Since April, the industry has added back 33,300 for a net addition of 7,500 jobs since the beginning of the year.

Industries that avoided large variations in employment

While virtually every industry saw some downturn in employment between January and April, there were industries that suffered less disruption.

Warehouse and storage. Warehouses in the state saw a small decrease of 2,700 jobs between January and April but quickly reversed those losses as more business shifted online. For the 11 months ending in November, the industry has added 7,200 jobs.

Finance and insurance. The industry suffered virtually no employment declines in the first four months of the year, and then began adding jobs. As a result the industry in Georgia is up by 6,000 jobs through November.

Consultants. Businesses engaged in management, scientific, and technical consulting saw a small drop in employment (-3,500 jobs) in the first four months, but then added 3,400 jobs over the next seven months for a net loss of only 100 jobs for the 11 months ending in November.

Private colleges and universities. Non-government colleges and universities saw their decrease come later than other industries in the state with their largest employment downturns occurring between May and August but then adding both those jobs and more between September and November. For the 11 months ending in November, the industry is reporting a net increase of 1,300 jobs.

Industries still reporting significant drops in employment

Some of the hardest-hit industries in Georgia are still showing significant employment decreases for the 11 months ending in November.

Food services and drinking places. Restaurants and bars saw a tremendous drop in employment due to a combination of local requirements that temporarily banned indoor dining, as well as people’s reluctance to go out to eat. Through April, the industry saw a loss of 165,600 jobs in Georgia and is still employing 36,200 fewer people than it did at the beginning of 2020.

Accommodations. Similar to food services, businesses such as hotels, saw large drops in their business and cut back employment with job losses of 23,100 through the first four months of 2020. The lodging business has not returned to prior levels with the result that the industry is reporting 11,300 fewer jobs than it recorded at the end of 2019.

Manufacturing. Employment in Georgia’s manufacturing sector dropped 46,000 in the first four months of 2020 and has only partially recovered with a net job loss of 17,800 as of November.

Professional, scientific, and technical services. This industry lost 20,300 jobs between January and April, and still is down by 13,900 seven months later.

Government. State and local government employment has not been immune to the job losses experienced by private industry in Georgia. Over the 11 months ending in November, state government has seen its workforce shrink by 10,500 while local government education has seen a decline of 14,500 jobs.

 


Monday, July 20, 2020

Job openings and separations in Georgia, 1st Quarter 2020


Compared to the nation, at the end of March, Georgia recorded a higher level of job openings, hires, and quits while posting a lower rate of total separations.

Experimental state-level data provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic impact started later in the state than in the nation as a whole.

Job Openings

In the 1st quarter of 2020, Georgia recorded 656,000 employment openings compared to 680,000 in the 1st quarter of 2019.  Job openings for the first two months of 2020 were comparable to those in the first two months of 2019 but then dropped by 27,000 in March of 2020 compared to March 2019.

The state’s openings rate stood at 4.3% at the end of the 1st quarter compared to a 4.9% rate in the 1st quarter of 2019.

At the end of March, the national job openings rate stood at 3.7%.

Hires

The number of hires increased by 15,000 in the 1st quarter compared to the 1st quarter of the previous year. Hiring remained steady throughout all three months of 2020.

The hiring rate at the end of March stood at 3.7%, the same as at the end of March 2019.

Nationally, the hire rate ended the quarter at 3.1%.

Separations

Total separations include quits, layoffs and discharges, and other separations. Total separations is
referred to as turnover. Quits are generally voluntary separations initiated by the employee. 

Therefore, the quits rate can serve as a measure of workers’ willingness or ability to leave jobs. Layoffs and discharges are involuntary separations initiated by the employer.

Separations totaled 638,000 in the 1st quarter with separations rising each month in 2020 compared to the same three months in 2019. Separations in the 1st quarter of 2019 equaled 516,000.

At the end of March, the total separations rate was 5.4% compared to 3.7% in March 2019. For the nation, the total separations rate at the end of the 1st quarter was 9.3% compared to a 3.3% rate in March 2019.

Both the number of quits as well as layoffs and discharges in Georgia rose each of the first three months of 2020 compared to the first three months of 2019.

For the 1st quarter of 2020, the number of quits equaled 349,000, while the number of layoffs and discharges came to 258,000.

For the 1st quarter of the previous year, the number of quits totaled 315,000 while the number of layoffs and discharges reached 157,000.

At the end March 2020, the quits rate was 2.4%, the same as in March 2019, while the layoffs and discharges rate rose to 2.8% compared to 1.1% in March 2019.

For the nation, the quits rate stood at 1.6% and the layoffs and discharge rate was 7.4% at the end of March.

About state-level JOLTS data

Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) estimates are based on a national sample of approximately 16,000 establishments. These data are used by policymakers, academics, industry experts, economists, and others to better understand the current state of the U.S. economy and to understand the dynamic activity of businesses in the economy that lead to aggregate employment changes.

While the current national sample size is designed to support estimates for major industries at the national level and total nonfarm estimates at the regional level, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is currently researching the possibility of leveraging the sample to produce model-assisted estimates at the state total nonfarm level. These estimates are currently identified as experimental as updates to the models are incorporated into this new data series.

BLS is encouraging data users to review these estimates and provide input on both the technical aspects of the models and on the usability of the resulting data.

More information can be found at https://www.bls.gov/jlt/jlt_statedata.htm.

Table A. Job openings, hires, quits, layoffs and discharges, and total separations rates for United States and Georgia, as of March 2020


Rates in Percent
Area
Job Openings Rate
Hires Rate
Quits Rate
Layoffs & Discharges Rate
Total Separations Rate
United States
3.7
3.1
1.6
7.4
9.3
Georgia
4.3
3.7
2.4
2.8
5.4